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BioTech Sector looking to Contingent Workforce Business Model

biotech“More reports from the BioTech sector that several leaders and growth-mode/start-ups are considering employing a global contingent workforce, even with the legal and regulatory challenges that come with it, to temporarily fill skills gaps on-demand and introduce more fluidity in recruitment. This includes new workforce-management models that recognize the advantages and challenges of an open-talent economy. The use of International partners with operations in-country is the backbone to implementing this strategy.” L.B.Calamaras, Global Client Solutions Director, CXC Global Americas.

Paul Strouts, global managing director for Hays Life Sciences, has pinpointed “The Five Hottest Life Science Jobs for 2017.” Two of the five are traditional R&D roles: research technician and senior researcher, especially in genomics and genetics. Two others are managerial roles: chief scientific officer and clinical project manager.

The fifth is more a category than a specific role—specialists who can fulfill critical skills gaps by applying skills beyond the master’s and doctoral degree graduates traditionally sought by Biopharma: “Mathematical and IT experience (are) coming high on hirers’ wish lists,” Strouts observed. “If you’re keen to break into this sector, now might be a good time to think about leveraging your existing experience.”

Greg Reh, U.S. and global life sciences sector leader for Deloitte, summed up several factors shaping how companies and their employees operate in the firm’s “2017 U.S. Life Sciences Industry Outlook.” Clinical and technical employees often work 24/7 on global innovation teams, aided by technologies such as cloud-based computing, robotics, and AI.

Significantly, Reh added, companies have begun switching from full-time employees toward part-time and on-demand or “contingent” workers such as contract employees, freelancers, and consultants.

“Some are considering employing a contingent workforce, even with the legal and regulatory challenges that come with it, to temporarily fill skills gaps on-demand and introduce more fluidity in recruitment,” Reh noted. “These developments and others call for new workforce-management models that recognize the advantages and challenges of an open-talent economy and the need to develop and retain employees with critical clinical, business, and technology skill sets.”

Those trends pose new challenges for Biopharma recruiters, who match employers with job candidates in significant portions of the industry.

Below is a list of 60 recruiters for Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical positions, unranked and listed alphabetically. That’s up from 50 firms last year, 40 in 2015, and 24 in GEN’s first recruiter list from 2013. Companies were included based on internet searches or publicly available online lists of Biopharma recruiters, but this list does not constitute a list of all Biopharma recruiters.

Listings include information furnished by the companies on their websites and other publicly available material, including their LinkedIn and Twitter pages and press announcements. Each recruiter is listed with its address, phone number, website, top executive(s), and year established.

The above article was posted May 1, 2017 by Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News.  Click here to see the original article.

 

 

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